VMWare: Temporarily Mount Your Shared Folders To Your Guest OS

When working with your VMWare machine, you will be faced with file exchanges from your host OS to your guest OS. Now, VMWare folder sharing in Windows environment is way easy. Unix or Linux guest operating systems, however, will require you to mount your host shared folder(s) to your guest OS.

This article will guide you to mount your host OS shared folders to your Unix/Linux guest OS.

Steps:

  1. In your Unix/Linux guest OS, login as ‘root’ and create your mount directory:

vm1     In this example, I’m creating a directory called ‘shares’ in the root of my Linux filesystem.

2. In your VMWare menu options, go to the virtual machine Sharing menu and add your host OS folder:

vm2     In my example, I want to share the ‘Downloads’ folder of my Macbook to my Linux guest OS.

3. Go to your guest OS, in my example, in my Linux guest OS, open a Terminal session. Login as ‘root’ and mount the ‘Downloads’ folder to my Linux ‘shares’ folder:

vm3

Do note that this type of mount is just temporary. When I reboot my virtual machine, this mount will be gone.

IMPORTANT NOTE:  The default location for your mounted shared folder(s) will be in /mnt/hgfs. Regardless of reboot, you will still able to access your shared folder(s) in that location.

4. After you mounted your shared folder, verify that it is successful.

vm45. That’s it, you have successfully mounted your host OS shared folder(s) to your Unix/Linux guest OS.

So why would you need to do this if you can access your shared folder(s) in /mnt/hgfs?

There are scenarios when you want to control where you want to access your shared folders. Sometimes, the administrator restricts the permission of /mnt/hgfs if there are too many shared folders.

 

‘Til next time. Au revoir.

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